Author, Photographer, Researcher, Artist, Adventurer and Buccaneer Extraordinaire

“Or at least that’s the plan each morning after coffee.”

DL Tolleson.com

THIS UNNAMED GEOLOGICAL formation is the likely result of wind, rain and time eroading away surface material to expose what at one time would have lava (magma) that had cooled and solidified. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved.
COMING INTO OR out of the Chisos Mountains, this is the northwest view and is several miles south of Panther Junction and the headquarters for Big Bend National Park. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved.
THE CLARET CUP is covered in barbed spines and blooms a reddish, cup-shaped flower from about April to June or July in Big Bend National Park. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved.
THIS VIEW FROM a formation called, “The Window,” looks out from the westside of the Chisos Mountains in Big Bend National Park. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved.
INDIAN HEAD MOUNTAIN and its southern region offers this “leaning” wall of geology at the western boundary of Big Bend National Park. The rocks of the foreground are boulders ranging from man-sized on up. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved.
MASSIVE AND TOWERING, this wall of the geology is at least a couple of hundrend feet high and situated in the Indian Head area of Big Bend National Park. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved.
WIDE-OPEN PANORAMAS and mountainous terrain such as this are routine along roadside in Big Bend National Park. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved.
THE SOUTHWEST SIDE of the Chisos Mountains, also known as the Chisos Mountain Basin and home to the lodge in Big Bend National Park. Copyright © 2011 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved.
A FALLEN TREE is an impassable barrier in an otherwise debris-free dry riverbed in Big Bend National Park. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved.
INDIGENOUS TO TEXAS, New Mexico and Arizona, Javelinas in Big Bend National Park genetically differ from swine. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved.
LOST MINE TRAIL in Big Bend National Park, looking southward over Juniper Canyon, the Chisos Mountain’s Northeast Rim and into Mexico. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved.
A TREE SILHOUETTED against the night sky as seen from Chisos Basin in Big Bend National Park. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved.
THIS VIEW EAST of a volcano is an illusion of the setting sun streaming through the Chisos Basin area behind Casa Grande Peak in Big Bend National Park. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved.
WRIGHT MOUNTAIN in background at Big Bend National Park. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved.
A VIEW WESTWARD after sundown from the Indian Head area of Big Bend National Park. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved.
A CAMERA COMPENSATION for the limited light after sundown provides this view westward from the Indian Head area of Big Bend National Park. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson/Camera One. All Rights Reserved.
SANTA ELENA CANYON after sunset, as seen from the Chimneys in Big Bend National Park. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson/Camera One. All Rights Reserved.

Publication History: Yield © Copyright 2001 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved. Excerpts from this work are permissible if author attribution is included. However, beyond this no part of this material may be reproduced in any form or by any means without written permission from the author.

Tolleson, DL. “Yield.”
DLTolleson.com, 2009.
http://www.dltolleson.com/poetry/yield.php.

Tolleson, DL. “Yield.”
TheLighthousePress.com, 2016.
http://www.thelighthousepress.com/dltolleson.com/poetry/yield.php.

Description: Poetry—208 words.

Commentary: I’ve been down the pre-marital (the “pre-right?”) relationship road a few times. Sometimes a person just has to let go or more difficult still, push away the other person. This can be an act of utter selfishness, self-preservation, or in the interest of the other person. It is this last possibility about which the poem Yeild was written.

We’ve all heard the trite phrases, “It’s not you, it’s me,” and, “You deserve someone better.” Generally speaking, those are typically cop-outs or a means to placate feelings. But in some rare cases those phrases each represent a cold and frank analysis of one’s limitations.

The question is not always whether a relationship can endure, but rather should it endure? Is it right for both people? Is there a transgression without contrition that is “holding back” the innocent person (or even the transgressor)? I speak not of marital couples here, because matrimonial vows are more than contractual agreements. Rather, I speak of couples who might be a mere step short of matrimony.

We all have spiritual components to our existence, but there are those among us who are attuned to their spiritual gifts and responsibilities. These are people who should not be held back by a relationship that is unequal in terms of “spirituality.” It is far better and more loving to set free someone than it is to be a spiritual albatross around that person’s neck (metaphorically speaking). Yes, sometimes the ‘”weaker” person may need, deserve or want a helping-hand to “step-up” and be a spiritual equal or near equal (but that’s an entirely different matter.)

The concern of the poem Yield, however, is “letting go.” It is at once an epistle of effort and contrition as well as an ode to sacrifice. There are people who would argue that if you love another you will do all that is necessary to accommodate and remain with that person. That’s fine as far as it goes, but it often goes much further and Yield addresses the extra distance unseen—especially when it concerns couples who do not belong together.

—DL Tolleson

YIELD
DL Tolleson

Star-crossed lovers
And poets debate
Are we the masters,
Or is it just fate?

Were foundations laid
And earth brought forth new?
Was I “made” by chance
Or “made” to love you?

Was our first meeting,
A pre-destined day,
Or a quirk of fate
And thus “come what may?”

So here we have come
Looking back to see,
If this was our choice
Or our destiny.

We never foresaw
A bus in the rain,
We never foresaw
A change in our reign.

Thus how can we say,
“We are in control,”
When all that we do
We cannot extol?

And yet we decide
To what to adhere,
To what drum you march
And the things I fear.

So the time has come
For you to depart.
And you take with you
A piece of my heart

Yes we are masters
Of a will to lose,
But we are servants
To the will we choose.

And the God we choose
Shall not long abide,
Inferior love
Or one who will hide.

I love you, you know,
But He wants your heart.
Superior Love,
And I yield my part.

So it is finished
And for you begins.
His love ever-lasting
Mine until life ends…