Author, Photographer, Researcher, Artist, Adventurer and Buccaneer Extraordinaire

“Or at least that’s the plan each morning after coffee.”

DL Tolleson.com

THIS UNNAMED GEOLOGICAL formation is the likely result of wind, rain and time eroading away surface material to expose what at one time would have lava (magma) that had cooled and solidified. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved.
COMING INTO OR out of the Chisos Mountains, this is the northwest view and is several miles south of Panther Junction and the headquarters for Big Bend National Park. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved.
THE CLARET CUP is covered in barbed spines and blooms a reddish, cup-shaped flower from about April to June or July in Big Bend National Park. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved.
THIS VIEW FROM a formation called, “The Window,” looks out from the westside of the Chisos Mountains in Big Bend National Park. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved.
INDIAN HEAD MOUNTAIN and its southern region offers this “leaning” wall of geology at the western boundary of Big Bend National Park. The rocks of the foreground are boulders ranging from man-sized on up. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved.
MASSIVE AND TOWERING, this wall of the geology is at least a couple of hundrend feet high and situated in the Indian Head area of Big Bend National Park. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved.
WIDE-OPEN PANORAMAS and mountainous terrain such as this are routine along roadside in Big Bend National Park. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved.
THE SOUTHWEST SIDE of the Chisos Mountains, also known as the Chisos Mountain Basin and home to the lodge in Big Bend National Park. Copyright © 2011 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved.
A FALLEN TREE is an impassable barrier in an otherwise debris-free dry riverbed in Big Bend National Park. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved.
INDIGENOUS TO TEXAS, New Mexico and Arizona, Javelinas in Big Bend National Park genetically differ from swine. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved.
LOST MINE TRAIL in Big Bend National Park, looking southward over Juniper Canyon, the Chisos Mountain’s Northeast Rim and into Mexico. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved.
A TREE SILHOUETTED against the night sky as seen from Chisos Basin in Big Bend National Park. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved.
THIS VIEW EAST of a volcano is an illusion of the setting sun streaming through the Chisos Basin area behind Casa Grande Peak in Big Bend National Park. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved.
WRIGHT MOUNTAIN in background at Big Bend National Park. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved.
A VIEW WESTWARD after sundown from the Indian Head area of Big Bend National Park. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved.
A CAMERA COMPENSATION for the limited light after sundown provides this view westward from the Indian Head area of Big Bend National Park. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson/Camera One. All Rights Reserved.
SANTA ELENA CANYON after sunset, as seen from the Chimneys in Big Bend National Park. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson/Camera One. All Rights Reserved.

Publication History: October Morning © Copyright 1999 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved. Excerpts from this work are permissible if author attribution is included. However, beyond this no part of this material may be reproduced in any form or by any means without written permission from the author.

Tolleson, DL. “October Morning.”
Facebook.com, 2008.
https://www.facebook.com/dl.tolleson/notes.

Tolleson, DL. “October Morning.”
DLTolleson.com, 2009.
http://www.dltolleson.com/poetry/octobermorning.php.

Tolleson, DL. “October Morning.”
TheLighthousePress.com, 2016.
http://www.thelighthousepress.com/dltolleson.com/poetry/octobermorning.php.

Description: Poetry—144 words.

Commentary: Written on an October morning, this poem was inspired by a drive en route from Denton Texas to Hurst via Fort Worth. It was also influenced by the art of Monet—specifically by his haystack (or “wheat”) paintings that I absolutely love.

While touching upon an introspection of life by asking if gray winter mornings are metaphors, the poem doesn’t dwell there. Instead, the narrative resolves on the note with which it is preoccupied: Namely the enjoyment of sensory perceptions on an October morning.

October Morning remains one of my favorites, perhaps because of my vivid memory of that morning. With the top down on my MG, the wind was brisk and the sunlight bathed the landscape in that defining sharpness that accompanied what seemed to be a change in the angle of the sun on the horizon. There comes a day in every October that I notice this.

I love these times, when in solitude, nature is a symphony of subtleness, clarity and beauty.

—DL Tolleson

OCTOBER MORNING
DL Tolleson

The heavens frosted
With cumulus gray—
Barely luminous
With the dawning day.

Dark fading away
And silence around,
Gives rise to lowing
And tentative sound.

Not too far distant
Stand mute stacks of hay,
Silently painted
Like those of Monet

Splashes of color
Subdued as a sigh,
Sprout without knowing
The winter draws neigh.

How different it seemed
When summer was near,
Vibrancy is gone
With winter now here.

Sooner or later
The earth changes roles,
Then we are left with
“For whom the bell tolls.”

We gather our cloaks
And push onward home,
But then we wonder
Which way should we roam?

Are winters only
Metaphors in grays,
Reminders of
Our shortening days?

Whatever the case
I like stacks of hay—
More so when bluish
Like those of Monet.

October morning,
A canopy of gray.
A chill in the air—
Another fine day.