Author, Photographer, Researcher, Artist, Adventurer and Buccaneer Extraordinaire

“Or at least that’s the plan each morning after coffee.”

DL Tolleson.com

THIS UNNAMED GEOLOGICAL formation is the likely result of wind, rain and time eroading away surface material to expose what at one time would have lava (magma) that had cooled and solidified. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved.
COMING INTO OR out of the Chisos Mountains, this is the northwest view and is several miles south of Panther Junction and the headquarters for Big Bend National Park. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved.
THE CLARET CUP is covered in barbed spines and blooms a reddish, cup-shaped flower from about April to June or July in Big Bend National Park. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved.
THIS VIEW FROM a formation called, “The Window,” looks out from the westside of the Chisos Mountains in Big Bend National Park. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved.
INDIAN HEAD MOUNTAIN and its southern region offers this “leaning” wall of geology at the western boundary of Big Bend National Park. The rocks of the foreground are boulders ranging from man-sized on up. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved.
MASSIVE AND TOWERING, this wall of the geology is at least a couple of hundrend feet high and situated in the Indian Head area of Big Bend National Park. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved.
WIDE-OPEN PANORAMAS and mountainous terrain such as this are routine along roadside in Big Bend National Park. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved.
THE SOUTHWEST SIDE of the Chisos Mountains, also known as the Chisos Mountain Basin and home to the lodge in Big Bend National Park. Copyright © 2011 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved.
A FALLEN TREE is an impassable barrier in an otherwise debris-free dry riverbed in Big Bend National Park. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved.
INDIGENOUS TO TEXAS, New Mexico and Arizona, Javelinas in Big Bend National Park genetically differ from swine. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved.
LOST MINE TRAIL in Big Bend National Park, looking southward over Juniper Canyon, the Chisos Mountain’s Northeast Rim and into Mexico. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved.
A TREE SILHOUETTED against the night sky as seen from Chisos Basin in Big Bend National Park. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved.
THIS VIEW EAST of a volcano is an illusion of the setting sun streaming through the Chisos Basin area behind Casa Grande Peak in Big Bend National Park. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved.
WRIGHT MOUNTAIN in background at Big Bend National Park. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved.
A VIEW WESTWARD after sundown from the Indian Head area of Big Bend National Park. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved.
A CAMERA COMPENSATION for the limited light after sundown provides this view westward from the Indian Head area of Big Bend National Park. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson/Camera One. All Rights Reserved.
SANTA ELENA CANYON after sunset, as seen from the Chimneys in Big Bend National Park. Copyright © 2010 by DL Tolleson/Camera One. All Rights Reserved.

Publication History: Redistribution Through Taxation. Copyright © 2011, 2013, 2019 by DL Tolleson. All Rights Reserved. Excerpts from this work are permissible if author attribution is included. However, beyond this no part of this material may be reproduced in any form or by any means without written permission from the author.

Tolleson, DL. “Redistribution Through Taxation.”
DLTolleson.com, 2009.
http://www.dltolleson.com/commentary/redistributionthroughtaxation.php.

Tolleson, DL. “Redistribution Through Taxation.”
TheLighthousePress.com, 2016.
http://www.thelighthousepress.com/dltolleson.com/commentary/redistributionthroughtaxation.php.

Description: Commentary » Political » General—427 words.

Commentary: This is a revision of an article orginally appearing as an April 14, 2011 entry in The Great American Novel Blog on this web site under the heading, American Affairs Thus Far. The original entry remains available in the 2011 Archive via the Compendium.

—DL Tolleson

REDISTRIBUTION THROUGH TAXATION
DL Tolleson

During 1946, the Chairman of the Federal Reserve Bank in New York wrote an article in a publication called American Affairs (I donated all my old copies to the library just a few years ago and went back to the library to personally look this up).

The then Chairman, Beardsley Ruml, noted that the Federal Reserve was able to create out of nothing all the money that the government would ever want. He said, in short, that since people with money spend on goods and services, prices respond by going up. To control this process money should be taken away through taxation so that instead, the government could spend it (this raises prices also, but he didn’t point that out)..

And then he wrote:

“The second principal purpose of federal taxes is to attain more equality of wealth and income than would result from economic forces working alone. The taxes which are effective for this purpose are the progressive individual income tax, the progressive estate tax and the gift tax. What these taxes should be depends on public policy with respect to the distribution of wealth and of income. These taxes should be defended and attacked in terms of their effect on the character of American life, not as revenue measures.”

“Taxes for Revenue Are Obsolete,” Beardsley Ruml, American Affairs, January, 1946 pp. 35-36

So who was Beardsley Ruml? After all, anyone can achieve a modicum of success and power while also being “off the wall.”

Well, Ruml had a Ph.D. in psychology, contributed to designing the U.S. Army aptitude and intelligence tests, was an adviser to President Herbert Hoover and is the “father” of automatic withholding that began in World War II by virtue of his designing it. In other words, you’re paying taxes because of what he helped create.

Ruml's quote is evidence that Socialist ideology has influenced American economic oversight from the top forces in government down to the man in the street. Throughout history Socialism has failed every time it was tried and the only way it can work in piecemeal is when free enterprise/capitalism lessens it damaging impact. America, with a population that has been the most socioeconomically comfortable of any throughout history, is the ultimate and final proof that vindicates Margaret Thatcher when, in 1976, she said, “...socialist governments traditionally do make a financial mess. They (socialists) always run out of other people’s money. It’s quite a characteristic of them.”

The question we face is, How many straws of socialism can be piled upon us before breaking the American camel’s back?